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ART on 5th presents Disney POP!

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If you’re a fan of Disney, then you’re definitely going to want to check out the upcoming exhibit at ART on 5th. Disney POP! is an exhibition of Pop style artwork by over a dozen official Disney Fine Artists. The exhibit will focus on the energetic Pop Art style of artists like Trevor Carlton, Tennessee Loveless, and Tim Rogerson. Their highly stylized work and Warholesque repetition of imagery lend a contemporary twist to these classic Disney characters.

Ce N’est Pas Un Chapeau by Tennessee Loveless, ©Disney

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This exhibition will kick off with a two-night opening weekend: Friday, July 28 from 7-9 PM and Saturday, July 29 from 7-9 PM. Tennessee Loveless and Tim Rogerson will be in attendance gallery painting live, dedicating artwork, and meeting fans on both opening night receptions. The opening night receptions are FREE, but an RSVP is required.

The Disney POP! collection will be on display at ART on 5th from Friday, July 26 – Friday, August 18, 2017.

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ART on 5th is located in the Corners Shopping Center at 3005 South Lamar Blvd, Suite C 110 B, Austin TX 78704, between Kerbey Lane Café and Torchy’s Tacos. The gallery is open Mondays through Saturdays 10 AM to 6 PM and Sundays from 12 NOON to 5 PM. Admission is FREE.

[gdlr_notification icon=”fa-camera” type=”color-background” background=”#999999″ color=”#ffffff”]Top image: “All Their Wicked Ways” by Tim Rogerson, ©Disney[/gdlr_notification]

Chase is the Founder and Creative Director of therepubliq.com, Host and Executive Producer of OutCast Austin, an award-winning LGBT weekly radio program on KOOP 91.7 FM in Austin. In 2011, he was named the Critics Pick for 'Most Gaybiquitous' in the Austin Chronicle's Best of Austin. In 2012, CultureMap Austin named him one of Austin's Top LGBT bloggers and he received the AGLCC's Chamber Award for Social Media Diva.

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Harry Ransom Center presents “Mexico Modern”

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Chronicling two decades of cultural exchange between Mexico and the United States, the exhibition “Mexico Modern: Art, Commerce, and Cultural Exchange, 1920–1945” showcases examples of modern Mexican art and design. It also documents the ways — through exhibitions, books and articles — this art was broadcast to new audiences, primarily in the United States. The exhibition demonstrates how, in the 1920s and 1930s, Mexican art that was initially received as avant-garde gained mainstream acceptance.

On display from September 11, 2017 through January 1, 2018 in the Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin, the exhibition highlights the important history of 20th-century art and how artists, museum curators, gallery owners, journalists and publishers in both countries instigated a cultural phenomenon by creating and promoting art that pioneered a synthesis of indigenous traditions and international aesthetics.

The more than 200 items in the exhibition, drawn primarily from the Ransom Center’s collections, reveal the importance of the transnational networks of individuals and institutions that sought, championed and interpreted many great, often radically new, works of art. The materials include paintings, photographs, jewelry and decorative arts, as well as correspondence, periodicals and exhibition brochures.

Frida Kahlo, Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird (1940). / photo credit: courtesy the Harry Ransom Center, the University of Texas at Austin.

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“‘Mexico Modern’,” notes guest curator Thomas Mellins, “provides a unique opportunity to showcase the Ransom Center’s remarkable collections to present a memorable cast of characters, whose connectedness is revealed not only through great works of art, but also via intimate media such as letters and snapshots.”

The popularity and prestige of Mexican art throughout the 1920s and 1930s was the direct result of a dynamic exchange between Mexico and the United States, where New York, Chicago and Los Angeles served as epicenters of cultural activism.

This Mexican moment encompassed artists such as painters Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Jean Charlot; graphic designer and art historian Miguel Covarrubias; photographers Nickolas Muray, Tina Modotti, Edward Weston and Manuel Álvarez Bravo; and jewelry designer William Spratling. Their work was championed by journalist and writer Anita Brenner, curator René d’Harnoncourt and publishers Frances Toor and Alfred and Blanche Knopf, among others. These individuals, many of whom traveled back and forth between the two nations, collectively became an important part of the historical narrative.

“Some of these individuals were famous in their lifetimes,” said Donald Albrecht, guest curator. “Others will be discoveries for some people visiting the show. One of the great pleasures of organizing ‘Mexico Modern’ has been to give these highly creative, though sometimes overlooked, people their due.”

Accompanying the exhibition is the book “Mexico Modern,” which will be published by the Museum of the City of New York and the Ransom Center in conjunction with Hirmer. The book features essays from the curators and profiles of leading figures showcased in the exhibition. Also included is an introductory essay by George F. Flaherty, assistant professor of Latin American and U.S. Latino art history at UT Austin, that explores the social, political and economic contexts of the era.

“Mexico Modern: Art, Commerce, and Cultural Exchange, 1920–1945″ can be seen starting Sept. 11 in the Ransom Center Galleries on Mondays through Fridays from 10 AM to 5 PM, with extended Thursday hours until 7 PM. The galleries are open from NOON to 5 PM on Saturdays and Sundays.

Public tours are offered every day at noon, Thursdays at 6 PM, and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 PM.

The Museum of the City of New York will host the exhibition in fall 2018.

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[gdlr_notification icon=”fa-camera” type=”color-background” background=”#999999″ color=”#ffffff”]Top image: Frida Kahlo, Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird (1940). / photo credit: courtesy the Harry Ransom Center, the University of Texas at Austin.[/gdlr_notification]

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Moderno: Design for Living in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela

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The Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas at Austin presents Moderno: Design for Living in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela, 1940–1978 from October 11, 2015 – January 17, 2016. Organized by the Americas Society in New York, the exhibition is the first to examine how design transformed the domestic landscape of Latin America, during a period marked by major stylistic developments and social and political change. The presentation features over 130 works, including furniture, ceramics, metalwork, textiles, and graphic design by Lina Bo Bardi, Clara Porset, Miguel Arroyo and others. To further highlight this innovative chapter in the history of Latin American modernism, the Blanton’s showing will expand upon the New York presentation to include additional furniture, domestic objects, and a selection of Brazilian, Mexican, and Venezuelan paintings from both the Blanton’s holdings and private collections.

“We are pleased to bring Moderno to Austin, and to build upon the Blanton’s tradition of presenting and collecting Latin American art,” remarked Blanton Director Simone Wicha. “Austin is a city rich with architects, designers, and those who love design, and we expect visitors to be engaged and inspired by this dynamic collection of objects. We are grateful to the Americas Society for the opportunity to share this important new scholarship.”

Sheltered from the overall destruction and disarray of World War II, many Latin American countries entered an expansive period of economic growth and artistic activity in the late 1940s through the 1950s. Modernism was viewed as a fitting and progressive style—particularly for Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela—and domestic design was endorsed as an agent for development and vehicle for innovation. By encouraging “a modern way of living” as an ideology, Latin American governments leveraged the movement to further their goals of modernizing the region’s major cities. As a result, a new crop of Latin American artists, architects, and designers emerged, including a large number of women. National art scenes flourished, new design vocabularies were invented, and designers began to see themselves as active players in the creation of modern national identities.

Designers in Latin America were influenced by an influx of European and North American creatives during the 1940s and 50s. They also drew inspiration from the work of the Bauhaus school and other European avant-garde groups of the period. Although Latin American designers incorporated the tenets of European and North American modernism into their work, they retained the cultural nuance and artistic traditions of their respective countries and utilized local materials, further contributing to the area’s economic expansion.

Fostered by Latin American governments and widely embraced by their metropolitan centers, Latin American designers rose to prominence and developed an international profile. In 1941, New York’s Museum of Modern Art hosted an international design competition, “Organic Design in Home Furnishings,” which featured a section devoted to Latin American design. This exhibition played a significant role in further establishing Latin American designers as players on an international stage.

Moderno presents new scholarship in the field of Latin American art and design, bringing together superb examples of furniture, ceramics, metalwork, textiles, and printed material from artists and designers including: Sergio Rodrigues, Lina Bo Bardi, Joaquim Tenreiro, and José Zanine Caldas of Brazil; Don Shoemaker, Clara Porset, and Pedro Ramírez Vásquez of Mexico; and Miguel Arroyo and María Luisa Zuloaga de Tovar of Venezuela. It is accompanied by a 200-page hardcover catalogue that includes contemporary essays, as well as newly translated historical texts on design. Publication of the catalogue will be celebrated at a special event at the Blanton, during the run of the exhibition.

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B scene: Bossa Nova

In celebration of Moderno, B scene explores the spirit of bossa nova, which literally means “new trend” in Portuguese. Experience an evening of cool jazz and sexy samba rhythms with music by DJ Michael Crockett and Brazilian musician Paula Maya and her band. Blanton members also enjoy an exclusive outdoor member lounge with light bites and a cash bar. The Blanton Museum of Art, 200 East Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., Austin TX 78701. Friday, October 23, 2015. 6-10 PM. All ages. FREE for members/ $12 general public. Tickets available online and at the door.

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[gdlr_heading tag=”h3″ size=”32px” color=”#ffffff” background=”#961D20″ font_weight=”bold”]THURSDAY 11/19[/gdlr_heading]

Perspectives: Latin American Design

Architecture professor Fernando Lara, Moderno co-curator Ana Elena Mallet, and a panel of Latin American design experts discuss and the legacy of design in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela. The Blanton Museum of Art, 200 East Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., Austin TX 78701. Thursday, November 19, 2015. 6:30-7:30 PM. All ages. Admission and programs on Thursdays are free..

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[gdlr_icon type=”icon-camera-retro” size=”16px” color=”#999999″]TOP IMAGE: Clara Porset, Interior for a Living Room, ca. 1960. Courtesy of Archivo Clara Porset CIDI/Facultad de Arquitectura/UNAM, Mexico City

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The Crusader Bible: A Gothic Masterpiece

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The Blanton Museum of Art at The University of Texas at Austin presents The Crusader Bible: A Gothic Masterpiece, an exhibition of over forty unbound pages from the one of the most celebrated French illuminated manuscripts of the Middle Ages from December 12, 2015 – April 3, 2016. On loan from the Morgan Library & Museum in New York, the Crusader Bible features Old Testament scenes in medieval settings, with brilliantly colored illustrations attributed to seven anonymous artists. To provide historical context for the Bible, the presentation features medieval arms and armor from New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. Also included are sixteenth-century Persian illustrations from the Metropolitan and the Ardashir-nama, a seventeenth-century Judeo-Persian manuscript of Old Testament stories from The Jewish Theological Seminary of America in New York.

“We are delighted to bring this rare and exquisite manuscript to Austin,” remarks Blanton director Simone Wicha. “Not only a beautiful work of art, the Crusader Bible has a rich and complex lineage that will engage and immerse our visitors in 700 years of world history. We are grateful to The Morgan Library & Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and The Jewish Theological Seminary of America for the opportunity to share these treasures.”

The history of the Crusader Bible is fascinating, covering seven centuries and multiple continents. Likely created in Paris during the 1240s for King Louis IX of France—famous for building the Sainte-Chapelle and for leading two crusades—the Bible then passed to the king’s younger brother, Charles of Anjou, who took it to Italy. More than four centuries later, the Archbishop of Cracow acquired and offered it as a diplomatic gift to the great Shah of Persia, ‘Abbas I. By the eighteenth century, the manuscript belonged to an anonymous Persian Jew. After its journey from France to Italy, Poland, and Persia, the Bible traveled to Egypt, England, and finally to The Morgan Library & Museum in the United States. The Crusader Bible, which originally had no text, bears inscriptions in Latin, Persian, and Judeo-Persian. They function as evidence of its changing ownership throughout the centuries and reflect how each owner used his language to lay claim to the book, appropriating its imagery for assimilation into their respective cultures.

The illuminations include some of the most compelling visualizations of the Old Testament, bringing Bible stories to life through vivid images that reflect medieval culture and the world of the Crusades. Designed to resonate with thirteenth-century French viewers, biblical characters are depicted as battling knights, equipped with contemporary arms and armor, and situated within medieval French towns. Loans from the Metropolitan Museum, including a shirt of mail, sword, prick spur, and war hat, will augment visitors’ understanding of the weaponry featured in the Crusader Bible.

Alongside the Christian perspective reflected in the Morgan’s manuscript, the exhibition offers Muslim and Jewish viewpoints on biblical narratives, revealed through Persian illustrations of the story of Joseph from the Metropolitan’s collection and in the manuscript of Esther and Ahasuerus from the Jewish Theological Seminary’s Ardashir-nama. Collectively, the works serve as a powerful reminder of the common roots of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and underscore the complex intersection between the politics, culture, and religion of the period.

The Crusader Bible: A Gothic Masterpiece is organized by The Morgan Library & Museum, New York. The curator of the exhibition at The Morgan is William Voelkle, Senior Research Curator, Department of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts, The Morgan Library & Museum.

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[gdlr_icon type=”icon-camera-retro” size=”16px” color=”#999999″]TOP IMAGE: Saul Defeats the Ammonites, from The Crusader Bible. Courtesy of The Morgan Library & Museum, New York

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